You are here: 
text zoom : S | M | L
Printer Friendly Version
Further Enquiries:

Electronic Music Unit
Elder Conservatorium of Music
The University of Adelaide
SA 5005 Australia

Phone: +61 8 8313 3550
(Country and interstate callers toll free on 1800 061 459)
Fax: +61 8 8313 4401

History of the
EMU.

Electronic music and music technology has an established history at the Elder Conservatorium of Music.

Below is a chronology detailing that history. Many thanks to honours student Sonia Wilkie who dedicated her time to researching and compiling this information.

 Dr. Henk Badings Peter Tahourdin Tristram Cary
 

Dr. Henk Badings

Peter Tahourdin

Tristram Cary

Martin Wesley-Smith Stockhausen Robyn Howard Jim Barbour

Martin
Wesley-Smith

Stockhausen

Robyn Howard

Jim Barbour

1962

In the second semester of 1962 Dr. Henk Badings (1907-1987), Dutch composer and scientist, came to Adelaide University as the first visiting composer. He introduced music concrete and electronic music to Adelaide with his concerts consisting mainly of tape pieces he had composed in his studio Utrecht, Holland. Unfortunately the music he produced whilst at Adelaide University has disappeared, and a Patch Panel he constructed at a visiting composers workshop remained only in existence at the university until the 1980's. His first term as visiting composer concluded at the end of 1962.

1963

Henk Badings returned during the second semester of 1963 completing his second and final term at the University of Adelaide as the visiting composer. A concert of Henk Badings works held on September 25th also featured preliminary experiments in spatial effects created by Derek Jolly who, with Graham Milne as his audio engineer, acted as technical director for Dr. Badings.

1964

Peter Tahourdin (b. England, 1928) studied composition with Richard Arnell at London's Trinity College of Music and graduated in 1952. He arrived in Australia in 1964 as the second visiting composer at the University of Adelaide and lectured in Analog Synthesis techniques.

1965

The establishment of the Electronic Music Studio at the University of Toronto in 1959, with a degree incorporating a strong component based on the Moog, led Peter Tahourdin to leave Adelaide University and undertake a masters degree in composition at the University of Toronto, 1965 – 1966.

1966

On completion of study at the University of Toronto, Peter Tahourdin returned to Adelaide University and became active as composer, lecturer and broadcaster. He received a commission from the Australian Ballet to compose the score for Illyria, which was first produced at the 1966 Adelaide Festival of Arts, and later appeared on television.

1967

Tristram Cary established the Royal College of Music's Electronic Music Studio and commenced lecturing 1967 - 1972. He began designing and building his own electronic music studio, which became one of the longest established private studios in the world. The equipment from this studio was brought to Australia, and incorporated into the studio at Adelaide University. Cary was also a founding Director of EMS (London) Ltd and co-designer of the VCS3 (Putney) synthesiser and various other EMS products.

Tristram Cary was responsible for all sounds in the Industrial Section, British Pavilion, at Montreal Expo '67.

1968

Tristram Cary organised the first Electronic Music conference in England, at Elizabeth Hall in London, selling out with 1500 attending.

1969

Derek Jolly, of the Gamba Studio (Melbourne Street, North Adelaide), purchased a Moog Synthesiser Mark III. This was one of the first Moog synthesisers to be exported out of the United States and the first to come to Australia.The arrival of the Moog, and Jolly providing its access to the University of Adelaide, allowed lecturer Peter Tahourdin to establish the first practical course in Electronic Music in Australia. Other universities had theoretical courses but this was the first with practical experience. Commencing in second semester, with ten students, the course work centred around operating the moog and utilising it as the sound source for tape manipulation. A demonstration of the Moog was given by Ian MacDonald in the Exhibition building at the Expo electric 1969. The demonstration presented the first piece to be composed on the instrument "Vietnam Image" by student Martin Wesley-Smith.

Peter Tahourdin received a commission to compose electronic music for a play on Cook's travels to be performed at the 1970 Adelaide festival.

Adelaide University Music Board structures electronic music course to commence in 1970.

1970

Stockhausen visited the University of Adelaide as part of his world tour. Peter Tahourdin attended a concert that featured several tape pieces previously composed at Stockhausen's studio in Cologne, part of the North/West German Radio Station.

Adelaide University request for studio facilities, lectureship in electronic music and a technician as part of a proposal to consolidate and develop the courses in electronic music. The request included the following equipment - 1 professional quality Half Track Stereo Tape Recorded - $4,000.00; 1 professional quality Four Track Stereo Tape Recorded - $8,000.00; Amplifiers and Loud Speakers - $1,500; Modular electronic music equipment; variable speed playback machine and a frequency counter and oscilloscope - $6,000.

1971

The University of Adelaide purchased the Moog from Derek Jolly. The original purpose of composing jingles with the Moog was proving unsuccessful as it was considered ahead of its time and limited by the current social perceptions.

1972

Peter Tahourdin leaves the University of Adelaide at the end of 1972 to commence lecturing in 1973 at the University of Melbourne, where he later became senior lecturer in composition. The University of Melbourne, purchase an EMS Synthi 100, that in now set up at the Grainger Museum. Tahourdin also held the position of chairman of the Composers' Guild of Australia in 1978-1979 before retiring from the University of Melbourne in 1988 to commence working full-time as a composer.

1973

Tristram Cary became a visiting senior lecturer at the University of Melbourne, which led to guest lecturing at numerous Australian Universities including Adelaide. A number of EMS synthesisers, of which Cary was one of the designers, were purchased by Adelaide University.

Clemens Leske gave notice that he wished the faculty to discuss a proposal to introduce a specialised course for Music Engineers to train operators of recording equipment. This course should be similar to courses in Germany for 'Tonemeisters'. He noted that musical aptitude, ability and education as well as technological training were essential for the successful operation of technological equipment for music operation.

1974

Tristram Cary, visiting composer at the University of Adelaide, introduces courses on digital synthesis and computing techniques.

1975

Tristram Cary accepts a position as a permanent staff member at the University of Adelaide and imports his private Fressingfield studio. The incorporation of Cary's studio with the University's establishes a new teaching / composition studio based on the 8th level of the Hughes, alongside the professor's office and other music departments. The studio also acquired new tape recorders and appointed technician Jim Barbour.

Robyn Howard demonstrates the VCS3.

1977

Jim Barbour built a 16-input into 4-output Mixing Desk which provided the central control hub for the entire studio located in the Hughes building.

1978

Technician Jim Barbour succeeded by Robert Sheppard.

Whilst reconstructing Elder Conservatorium, the studio equipment was housed in the Physics building, with performances held in Bonython hall. It was in the Physics building that Tristram Cary wrote “Steam Music”. On completion of the reconstruction the intention was to base the studio in First Hall, now known as Bishop Hall, with a staircase leading up to Elder Hall. However, this could not materialise due to the First Hall's load bearing walls so it was established in the basement of Elder Conservatorium. Lines were plugged in Elder Hall, a double glazed window was installed between the two studio rooms, with the smaller a chamber music recording studio, later also doubling as the computer room. The conservatorium purchased the New England Digital Computer Synthesiser and the Equipment Committee of the University purchased an 8-track tape recorder as well as three 4-track and four stereo machines.

1979

Technician Robert Sheppard was succeeded by Daniel Schumacher.

1980

12 - 16 May, ANZAAS Jubilee Congress Week Concert.

Tristram Cary restructures the Electronic Music courses offered to three graded levels: (1) A studio Foundation course; (2) Electronic Music Composition Techniques. This assumes basic technical knowledge and concentrates on the creative and compositional aspects. It covered techniques of tape manipulation to the use of VCS3's and (3) Computer Music Studies which features computer music techniques.

1982

Tristram Cary is made Dean of Music at University of Adelaide for the Second time.

1983

The University's studio became the first studio in South Australia to offer digital recording.

1984

Tristram Cary composed "Echo Still Sunset", performed at Wills court, University of Adelaide, for the vice chancellor.

1986

Tristram Cary left the University of Adelaide to resume self-employment, operating as Tristram Cary Creative Music Services. Cary was largely occupied with writing "The Illustrated Compendium of Musical Technology", published by Faber and Faber, May 1992.

1991

Tristram Cary was awarded the Order of Australia Medal (OAM) for his services to music.

1994

New studio built in the Schulz building and adopts the title PATU - Performing Arts Technology Unit.

1995

Performances in London and Adelaide marked Tristram Cary’s 70th birthday and a new suite based on his music for the Ealing film The Ladykillers won The Gramophone Award for best film music CD in 1998.

1997

Silver Moon appointed Studio Technician.

1999

Tristram Cary received the SA Great Music Award.

2000

Symphony Australia commissioned a new work (Scenes from a Life) to mark Tristram Cary's 75th birthday.

2001

The Elder Conservatorium amalgamates with Flinders Street School of Music and becomes the Elder School of Music.

Tristram Cary conferred the degree of Doctor of Music at Adelaide University.

2002

Bachelor of Music Studies(Music Technology) introduced.

2005

Elder School of Music changes it's name back to the Elder Conservatorium.

return to top

References

Anon. "Concert a Real Surprise." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1974).

Anon. "Demonstration of Electronic Music Studio - Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1962).

Anon. "Elder Hall Concert - Electronic Music of Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1962).

Anon. "Elder Hall Concert - Electronic Music of Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1962).

Anon. "Elder Hall Concert - Electronic Music of Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1962).

Anon. "Elder Hall Concert - Music of Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Anon. "Elder Hall Concert - Music of Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Anon. "Electronic Music at Seminar." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1962).

Anon. "Faculty of Music Minutes." 1969. Vol. The University of Adelaide Archives.

Anon. "Faculty of Music Minutes." 1970. Vol. The University of Adelaide Archives.

Anon. "Faculty of Music Minutes." 1973. Vol. The University of Adelaide Archives.

Anon. "Machine Music Is the Latest Course." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1969).

Anon. "Moog to Get His Degree." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1969).

Anon. "Music." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1974).

Anon. "Sound and Recordings Feature - Adelaide Has $10,000 Moog." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1969).

Anon. "University Music Society - Music of Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1962).

Anon. "University Music Society - Music of Henk Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Bourne, Warren. "Electronic Sounds and Shapes." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1976).

Bramley, Lisbeth. "Watching a Radio Show." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1971).

Cary, Tristram. 2005.

Cary, Tristram. "Adventures and Dangers." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1976).

Cary, Tristram. A Brief History of Electronic Music at the University of Adelaide. 1980.

Cary, Tristram. Tristram Cary. 2004. Available: www.tristramcary.com. 10 January 2005.

Hince, Kenneth. "In the Moog." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1969).

Horner, John. "Big Audience for Electronic Music." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Horner, John. "Farewell to Dr. Badings." Adelaide University Archives, Newspaper Articles (1962).

Horner, John. "Final Badings Recital." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Horner, John. "Music of Moderns." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1965).

Horner, John. "Stirring Farewell to Composer." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Horner, John. "Symphony by Dr. Badings." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Horner, John. "Unique Badings Concert." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Horner, John. "Unique Badings Concert." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Horner, John. "The Young South Australians - Tempest of Sound." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1972).

Middenway, Ralph. "Electronic - and It Can Work." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1974).

Moon, Silver. 2005. Personal Communication.

Renfrey, James. "Switched-on Sounds." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1974).

Salsbury, Elizabeth. "Composer Recognised." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1976).

Salsbury, Elizabeth. "Concerts Produce a Discord." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1976).

Tahourdin, Peter. 2005. Personal Communication.
Personal communication with Peter Tahourdin 16 February, 2005.

Tahourdin, Peter. Peter Tahourdin. August 2000. Available: www.melbournecomposersleague.org/tahourdin.htm. 10 January 2005.

Tidemann, Harold. "Composer's 21 Years." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1963).

Tidemann, Harold. "The Sound of Moog Music." Adelaide University Archives Newspaper Articles (1969).